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Researchers suggest coffee production will most likely move higher up the region’s mountains, and drop drastically overall.
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Agroforestry is one way of adapting coffee production to climate change, but few varieties are suitable. BREEDCAFS, a new project led by CIRAD and funded by the EU H2020 programme, aims to diversify the range of varieties available for this more sustainable production method.
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 The shade tree advice tool guides coffee and cocoa farmers on choosing shade trees whose ecosystem services will best meet their needs, based on fellow coffee farmers' local knowledge in their region. 

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Farmers across the region, known for high-quality arabica beans, are still recovering from a coffee leaf rust disease known as roya, which devastated crops over the past four years. Now, lower-altitude areas are becoming unsuitable for growing coffee as temperatures heat up. Cocoa thrives in the warmer weather.
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Two innovative projects that address climate change in developing countries — an imaginative program in Mozambique that produces starch for craft beer from cassava and another that helps cities worldwide develop resiliency to disaster — have won the coveted 2015 Corporate Adaptation Prize awarded by the University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation In
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Coffee plants are particularly sensitive to changes in temperature. As climate change warms the regions where coffee is traditionally grown, farmers have to move their plantations to higher ground. New research warns that in many countries coffee production may even disappear altogether [1].