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The Guardian

Soon, soybeans will be bred to yield stable oil without the addition of dangerous trans fats. Lettuce will be grown to handle warmer, drier fields. Wheat to contain less gluten. And pigs bred to resist deadly viruses. Someday, maybe even strawberry plants whose delicate berries can be picked by machine instead of by hand.

PortalFrutícola

After years of research, Chinese experts have recently launched a new variety of Cavendish banana resistant to TR4, which is used for export. The new variety was developed using chemical mutagenesis techniques. Other countries, including the Philippines, are in advanced stages of developing their own varieties through gamma irradiation.

TechXplore

Iowa State University scientists are working toward a future in which farmers can use unmanned aircraft to spot, and even predict, disease and stress in their crops. Their vision relies on machine learning, an automated process in which technology can help farmers respond to plant stress more efficiently. 

Phys.org

Researchers from the University of Cambridge's Sainsbury Laboratory (SLCU) and Department of Plant Sciences have discovered that drought stress triggers the activity of a family of jumping genes (Rider retrotransposons) previously known to contribute to fruit shape and colour in tomatoes.

Agritotal

Wild plants grow in all agricultural fields that reduce crop yields by competing with them for water, light and nutrients. To control them, the most frequent management among producers is based on the use of herbicides. These agrochemicals are most effective when applied at the time weeds barely emerge.

Farm Progress

Beekeepers have been losing an average of 30% of overwintered colonies for nearly 15 years. It is expensive to overwinter colonies in areas where winter temperatures stay above freezing. A less expensive practice of overwintering bee colonies in cold storage is becoming popular.